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The salary you must earn to buy a home in 27 metros

See below exactly how much salary you would need to earn in order to afford the principal, interest, taxes and insurance payments on a median-priced home in 27 metro areas.

Key takeaways:

  • For the first time in this series, in the commentary section of each slide, we discuss how the salary numbers change when a borrower puts 10 percent down compared with 20 percent. Here’s a hint: things become a lot more expensive. See the commentary portion of each slide to learn more.
  • The largest salary increase occurred in the Los Angeles metro area where home prices were up nearly 14 percent in the third quarter.
  • At 20 percent down, the required salary to purchase a median-priced home in the Pittsburgh metro is $33,729. In the San Francisco metro, the required salary is $153,152. If you put 10 percent down, the required salary in the Pittsburgh and San Francisco metros increases to $38,663 and $185,023, respectively.
  • Mortgage rates sported a mild increase in every metro area on our list.
 

Chicago

How much salary do you need to earn in order to afford the principal, interest, taxes and insurance payments on a median-priced home in your metro area?

To find out, HSH.com took the National Association of Realtors’ 2015 third-quarter data for median-home prices and HSH.com’s 2015 third-quarter average interest rate for 30-year, fixed-rate mortgages to determine how much of your salary it would take to afford the base cost of owning a home -- the principal, interest, taxes and insurance -- in 27 metro areas.

We used standard 28 percent "front-end" debt ratios and a 20-percent down payment subtracted from the NAR’s median-home-price data to arrive at our figures. We've incorporated available information on property taxes and homeowners insurance costs to more accurately reflect the income needed in a given market. Read more about the methodology and inputs on the final slide of this slideshow.

On a national scale, a homebuyer purchasing a median-priced home of $229,000 would need to earn a yearly salary of $54,421. Those figures are based on a 20-percent down payment which totals $46,000. If you cannot afford to put that much cash towards your down payment, consider putting 10 percent down instead. With just 10 percent down, the down payment falls to $22,900, but the required salary increases to $60,390 due to a higher loan amount and the requirement to pay monthly Private Mortgage Insurance (PMI).

Here’s a current look at how much salary you would need to earn in order to afford the principal, interest, taxes and insurance payments on a median-priced home in your metro area. Be sure to read the commentary in each slide to see how the numbers change when putting 10 percent down.

Mortgage rate: 3.96 percent

  • Quarterly change: +0.09 percent

Home price: $143,000

  • Quarterly change: +2.88 percent
  • YOY change: -1.38 percent

Monthly payment: $787.01

Salary: $33,729.07

  • Quarterly change: +$897.54

The Pittsburgh metro area is back on top in terms of affordability. Pittsburgh is more affordable than Cleveland, despite having a higher home price, mainly because taxes are lower in the Pittsburgh area. If a Pittsburgh buyer was to put just 10 percent down instead of 20 percent, the required salary increases by nearly $5,000.

Mortgage rate: 4.08 percent

  • Quarterly change: +0.12 percent

Home price: $132,000

  • Quarterly change: +1.77 percent
  • YOY change: +1.62 percent

Monthly payment: $802.72

Salary: $34,402.31

  • Quarterly change: +$688.15

If a borrower in the Cleveland metro area puts 10 percent down instead of 20 percent, the required salary increases by $4,594 because the loan amount is higher by $13,200 and there is a monthly PMI cost of $47.

Mortgage rate: 4.11 percent

  • Quarterly change: +0.13 percent

Home price: $150,300

  • Quarterly change: -1.05 percent
  • YOY change: +0.87 percent

Monthly payment: $851.28

Salary: $36,483.38

  • Quarterly change: +$126.03

How do the Cincinnati-metro figures change once a homebuyer decides to put 10 percent down instead of 20 percent? While the down payment is cut in half, the loan amount and monthly payment increases, requiring a higher salary. The required salary to purchase the median-priced home in the Cincinnati metro goes up to $41,725.

Mortgage rate: 4.05 percent

  • Quarterly change: +0.11 percent

Home price: $160,000

  • Quarterly change: +1.85 percent
  • YOY change: +6.52 percent

Monthly payment: $877.43

Salary: $37,603.97

  • Quarterly change: +$819.03

A 20-percent down payment on the median-priced home in the St. Louis metro is $32,000. If you decide to put down just 10 percent, you will have a monthly PMI payment of $53 and you will need to earn $5,556 more per year.

Mortgage rate: 4.12 percent

  • Quarterly change: +0.07 percent

Home price: $156,317

  • Quarterly change: +2.27 percent
  • YOY change: +3.18 percent

Monthly payment: $894.43

Salary: $38,332.76

  • Quarterly change: +$788.36

A 10-percent down payment raises the monthly payment in the Motor City metro by $76 per month; the required salary rises to $43,788 and introduces the need for PMI which will cost you $52 per month.

Mortgage rate: 4.10 percent

  • Quarterly change: +0.13 percent

Home price: $178,900

  • Quarterly change: -1.43 percent
  • YOY change: +6.81 percent

Monthly payment: $919.17

Salary: $39,393.11

  • Quarterly change: +$36.66

A 20-percent down payment on a $178,900 home is $35,780. Cutting that down payment in half (10 percent) will set you back just $17,890. While the upfront costs are certainly lower, the required annual salary increases to $45,628 in order to cover the larger loan amount.

Mortgage rate: 4.19 percent

  • Quarterly change: +0.15 percent

Home price: $175,000

  • Quarterly change: No change
  • YOY change: +20.69 percent

Monthly payment: $980.25

Salary: $42,010.79

  • Quarterly change: +$522.57

Luckily for buyers in the Tampa metro area, higher home prices took a time-out in the third quarter, limiting the increase of the required annual salary. If you opt to put 10 percent down on a median-priced home in the Tampa area, you’re looking at an even higher salary requirement: $48,149.

Mortgage rate: 4.09 percent

  • Quarterly change: +0.12 percent

Home price: $218,800

  • Quarterly change: +0.41 percent 
  • YOY change: +9.13 percent

Monthly payment: $1,022.86

Salary: $43,836.81

  • Quarterly change: +$666.73

Phoenix remains the first metro area on our list to exceed a $200,000 home price and a $1,000 monthly payment. But if you cannot afford to save $43,760 for a 20-percent down payment, you’re looking at a higher loan amount, monthly payment and salary. The salary you must earn in the Phoenix metro area when putting 10 percent down is $51,457.

Mortgage rate: 4.11 percent

  • Quarterly change: +0.12 percent

Home price: $201,200

  • Quarterly change: +1.62 percent
  • YOY change: +11.78 percent

Monthly payment: $1,103.73

Salary: $47,302.80

  • Quarterly change: +$1,001.88

In comparison to the other metro areas on our list, the Orlando metro saw one of the higher salary increases during the third quarter. If you were to put 10 percent down instead of 20 percent, the required salary increases by $7,017, the second-largest salary increase on the list so far.

Mortgage rate: 4.09 percent

  • Quarterly change: +0.10 percent

Home price: $199,300

  • Quarterly change: -0.05 percent 
  • YOY change: +6.92 percent

Monthly payment: $1,130.99

Salary: $48,470.87

  • Quarterly change: +$378.57

To purchase the median-priced home in the San Antonio metro with 10 percent down, borrowers need to earn an annual salary of $55,411.79. That increase ($6,941) is needed to afford a loan amount that increases by nearly $20,000 due to the smaller down payment and a monthly PMI cost of $66.

Mortgage rate: 4.07 percent

  • Quarterly change: +0.11 percent

Home price: $228,700

  • Quarterly change: -0.22 percent
  • YOY change: +4.38 percent

Monthly payment: $1,199.01

Salary: $51,386.23

  • Quarterly change: +$416.27

Quarterly-home-price growth has slowed in the Twin Cities metro area, and that’s a good thing for buyers, especially those who cannot afford to put 20 percent down. Borrowers need to earn nearly $8,000 more per year when putting 10 percent down on a median-priced home in the Minneapolis metro.

Mortgage rate: 4.09 percent

  • Quarterly change: +0.12 percent

Home price: $210,000

  • Quarterly change: -2.42 percent 
  • YOY change: +8.53 percent

Monthly payment: $1,227.30

Salary: $52,598.53

  • Quarterly change: -$349.05

While yearly-price growth remains strong in the Dallas metro area, quarterly-price growth stalled during the third quarter, reducing the required salary by about $350. If you can’t afford to make a 20-percent down payment and choose to put 10 percent down instead, be prepared for the required salary to increase by $7,314.

Mortgage rate: 4.09 percent

  • Quarterly change: +0.15 percent

Home price: $217,200

  • Quarterly change: -1.76 percent 
  • YOY change: +7.26 percent

Monthly payment: $1,252.89

Salary: $53,695.27

  • Quarterly change: +$10.83

Lower quarterly home prices and only moderately higher mortgage rates led to a third-quarter salary increase of just $11. However, that meager salary increase goes out the window if you decide to put 10 percent down instead of 20 percent. The required salary with a 10-percent down payment increases to $61,260.

Mortgage rate: 4.06 percent

  • Quarterly change: +0.10 percent

Home price: $234,700

  • Quarterly change: +1.29 percent
  • YOY change: +1.47 percent

Monthly payment: $1,291.24

Salary: $55,338.66

  • Quarterly change: +$952.89

The Philly metro saw only a mild decline in affordability in the third quarter. Unlike the huge salary jump of $5,609 in the second quarter, the salary needed in the third quarter only rose by $953. If you’re not making a 20-percent down payment in the City of Brotherly Love, you’ll need to earn an annual salary of $63,495 to cover the higher loan amount and monthly PMI costs associated with a 10-percent down payment.

Mortgage rate: 4.01 percent

  • Quarterly change: +0.12 percent

Home price: $252,300

  • Quarterly change: -0.86 percent
  • YOY change: -1.37 percent

Monthly payment: $1,308.63

Salary: $56,083.99

  • Quarterly change: +$241.23

Homebuyers in the Baltimore metro were happy to see flat home prices in the third quarter. In the second quarter, home prices were up 14 percent causing the required salary to increase by nearly $5,600. During the third quarter, borrowers making a 20-percent down payment only saw salary requirements increase by $241. However, that all changes when borrowers put 10 percent down. With 10 percent down, the required salary rises by nearly $9,000.

Mortgage rate: 4.08 percent

  • Quarterly change: +0.11 percent

Home price: $229,300

  • Quarterly change: -0.52 percent 
  • YOY change: +3.38 percent

Monthly payment: $1,432.02

Salary: $61,372.12

  • Quarterly change: +$303.63

Home prices were up nearly 20 percent in the Chicago metro back in the second quarter, and with a third-quarter decline of less than 1 percent, those higher prices are still hanging on. Want to make things even more expensive? Put 10 percent down instead of 20 percent – the required salary increases from $61,372 to $69,352.

Mortgage rate: 4.13 percent

  • Quarterly change: +0.10 percent

Home price: $291,400

  • Quarterly change: +0.14 percent
  • YOY change: +5.85 percent

Monthly payment: $1,450.45

Salary: $62,162.20

  • Quarterly change: +$644.56

Price growth has been a bit more subdued in the Sacramento metro area, limiting the increase in the required salary when making a 20-percent down payment ($58,280). That means buyers in the River City metro would basically need to save a year’s salary to put 20 percent down. If that’s not realistic, 10 percent down will run you $29,140, you’ll have to pay $96 per month for PMI, and the required salary becomes $72,340.

Mortgage rate: 4.14 percent

  • Quarterly change: +0.14 percent

Home price: $290,000

  • Quarterly change: +0.03 percent
  • YOY change: +7.41 percent

Monthly payment: $1,495.95

Salary: $64,112.43

  • Quarterly change: +$822.37

Despite very little price growth in the third quarter, the required salary in the Miami metro was still up $822 due to slightly higher mortgage rates. If you’re putting 10 percent down, the required salary jumps to over $74,000.

Mortgage rate: 4.13 percent

  • Quarterly change: +0.12 percent

Home price: $319,300

  • Quarterly change: +1.43 percent 
  • YOY change: +9.61 percent

Monthly payment: $1,551.84

Salary: $66,507.55

  • Quarterly change: +$1,498.13

The combination of moderately higher mortgage rates and home prices had an adverse effect on affordability. If you cannot afford to make a 20-percent down payment, affordability declines even further. When putting 10 percent down, the loan amount swells by nearly $32,000, and there is a monthly PMI cost of $105, causing the required salary to increase to $77,659.

Mortgage rate: 4.13 percent

  • Quarterly change: +0.09 percent

Home price: $353,000

  • Quarterly change: -2.73 percent
  • YOY change: +11.89 percent

Monthly payment: $1,608.02

Salary: $68,915.21

  • Quarterly change: -$997.03

Affordability was up in the Denver metro during the third quarter thanks to lower home prices. However, monthly payments will rise when putting 10 percent down instead of 20 percent. With 10 percent down, the monthly payment in the Denver metro increases to $1,779 because the loan amount inflates by $35,300. Furthermore, the required salary increases to $81,244.

Mortgage rate: 4.18 percent

  • Quarterly change: +0.13 percent

Home price: $386,300

  • Quarterly change: +0.26 percent
  • YOY change: +7.34 percent

Monthly payment: $1,849.95

Salary: $79,283.37

  • Quarterly change: +$1,164.40

Last quarter, a Seattle-area resident told us, “You can't buy a dog house [in Seattle] anymore for $385,000. Prices have surged 12 percent in the last year alone.” While price growth, according to the NAR, hasn’t been quite that robust, Seattle-area homebuyers are happy to see a quarterly price gain of less than 1 percent, especially when a 10-percent down payment increases the required salary to $92,823.

Mortgage rate: 4.07 percent

  • Quarterly change: +0.17 percent

Home price: $388,600

  • Quarterly change: -3.76 percent
  • YOY change: -0.13 percent

Monthly payment: $1,910.39

Salary: $81,873.73

  • Quarterly change: -$1,153.50

A big swing in affordability occurred in the D.C. metro area between March and August. In the second quarter, buyers needed to earn $7,000 more per year to afford the median-priced home. During the third quarter, the required salary reversed course by over $1,100. However, if you’re putting 10 percent down instead of 20 percent, you’ll need to earn over $13,500 more per year to cover the larger loan amount and PMI.

Mortgage rate: 4.06 percent

  • Quarterly change: +0.09 percent

Home price: $410,500

  • Quarterly change: +0.02 percent
  • YOY change: -0.36 percent

Monthly payment: $2,134.94

Salary: $91,497.39

  • Quarterly change: +$747.25

The New York metro moved up two places on our list this time around. Flat home prices and a mild increase in mortgage rates prompted the required salary to increase by only $747. But that mild increase is only if you’re putting 20 percent down. With a 10-percent down payment, the required salary in the Big Apple metro jumps to $105,763.

Mortgage rate: 4.03 percent

  • Quarterly change: +0.12 percent

Home price: $449,000

  • Quarterly change: +8.30 percent
  • YOY change: +12.28 percent

Monthly payment: $2,165.26

Salary: $92,796.90

  • Quarterly change: +$6,632.75

Home-price growth in the Boston metro has led to the second-highest salary increase on our list. But what if you can’t afford to put nearly $90,000 toward a 20-percent down payment? If you put 10 percent down the required salary increases by another $15,570.

Mortgage rate: 4.06 percent

  • Quarterly change: +0.12 percent

Home price: $506,800

  • Quarterly change: +13.84 percent
  • YOY change: +5.17 percent

Monthly payment: $2,322.31

Salary: $99,527.51

  • Quarterly change: +$11,212.19

While not the most expensive metro area on our list, the Los Angeles metro had the highest salary jump at over $11,000. More bad news: The required salary increases by another $19,491 if you are only putting 10 percent down.

Mortgage rate: 4.11 percent (jumbo rate)

  • Quarterly change: +0.07 percent

Home price: $554,400

  • Quarterly change: +1.20 percent
  • YOY change: +7.07 percent

Monthly payment: $2,489.57

Salary: $106,695.94

  • Quarterly change: +$1,856.21

Mild price and rate increases during the third quarter led to a limited salary increase (by California standards) in the San Diego metro area. However, if you decide to put 10 percent down instead of 20 percent, the required salary grows by over $22,000 to $128,704.

Mortgage rate: 3.98 (jumbo rate)

  • Quarterly change: +0.03 percent

Home price: $809,400

  • Quarterly change: -1.36 percent
  • YOY change: +8.73 percent

Monthly payment: $3,573.55

Salary: $153,152.08

  • Quarterly change: -$1,343.31

Things became more affordable in the San Francisco metro area? While seemingly unheard of, it actually happened! But the good news ends there. If you can’t afford a 20-percent down payment ($161,880), a 10-percent down payment will require a pay raise of about $32,000 more per year.

To compile these results, HSH.com calculated the annual before-tax income required to cover the mortgage's principal, interest, tax and insurance payments. We used standard 28 percent "front-end" debt ratios and a 20-percent down payment subtracted from the median-home-price data to arrive at our figures. Loans with less than a 20-percent down payment require mortgage insurance, which would in turn increase the required salary.

We utilized the NAR's 2015 third-quarter data for median home prices and our 2015 third-quarter average interest rate for a 30-year, fixed-rate mortgage to determine how much money homebuyers in 27 major metro areas would need to earn in order to purchase the median-priced home in their market.

The average mortgage rate information we used was for purchase-money mortgages made to borrowers with good-to-excellent credit.

We created metropolitan-area average property tax information using data made available from the Census Bureau's American Community Survey (ACS). We use 2011-2013 ACS 3-year estimates, which are the latest available. We used the latest available data for statewide average homeowner insurance premium costs from the Insurance Information Institute.

Note: Property taxes and insurance costs are specific to an individual property itself and will be different for any single property in which you may have an interest. Also, if other personal debts exceed 8 percent of one's given monthly gross income, this will increase the salary needed to qualify.

PMI costs used in our 10-percent calculations are for 30-year, fixed-rate mortgages. For conforming loan amounts, these are costs for FICO scores of greater than 720 but less than 759; for jumbo loan amounts, these costs are for FICO scores of 760 or greater. You can calculate mortgage insurance costs for other credit scores, down payment amounts and mortgage types using HSH.com's PMI Cost Calculator.

Home-price data for the Pittsburgh metro area was provided by RealSTATs, a locally owned and operated real estate information company. Home-price data for Detroit was provided by Realcomp II Ltd., Michigan's largest Multiple Listing Service.

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How much salary do you need to earn in order to afford the principal, interest, taxes and insurance payments on a median-priced home in your metro area?

Cleveland Pittsburgh St. Louis Cincinnati Detroit Atlanta Tampa Phoenix Orlando San Antonio Minneapolis Dallas Houston Philadelphia Chicago Baltimore Sacramento Miami Denver Portland Seattle Washington Boston Los Angeles New York City San Diego San Francisco

Cities 30-Year Fixed Mortgage Rate % Change from 2Q15 Median Home Price % Change from 2Q15 Monthly Payment (PITI) Salary Needed
National 4.08% +0.23% $229,000 +0.12 $1,223.15 $52,420.76
Pittsburgh 3.96% +0.09% $143,000 +2.88 $787.01 $33,729.07
Cleveland 4.08% +0.12% $132,000 +1.77 $802.72 $34,402.31
Cincinnati 4.11% +0.13% $150,300 -1.05 $851.28 $36,483.38
St Louis 4.05% +0.11% $160,000 +1.85 $877.43 $37,603.97
Detroit 4.12% +0.07% $156,317 +2.27 $894.43 $38,332.76
Atlanta 4.10% +0.13% $178,900 -1.43 $919.17 $39,393.11
Tampa 4.19% +0.15% $175,000 +0.00 $980.25 $42,010.79
Phoenix 4.09% +0.12% $218,800 +0.41 $1,022.86 $43,836.81
Orlando 4.11% +0.12% $201,200 +1.62 $1,103.73 $47,302.80
San Antonio 4.09% +0.10% $199,300 -0.05 $1,130.99 $48,470.87
Minneapolis 4.07% +0.11% $228,700 -0.22 $1,199.01 $51,386.23
Dallas 4.09% +0.12% $210,000 -2.42 $1,227.30 $52,598.53
Houston 4.09% +0.15% $217,200 -1.76 $1,252.89 $53,695.27
Philadelphia 4.06% +0.10% $234,700 +1.29 $1,291.24 $55,338.66
Baltimore 4.01% +0.12% $252,300 -0.86 $1,308.63 $56,083.99
Chicago 4.08% +0.11% $229,300 -0.52 $1,432.02 $61,372.12
Sacramento 4.13% +0.10% $291,400 +0.14 $1,450.45 $62,162.20
Miami 4.14% +0.14% $290,000 +0.03 $1,495.95 $64,112.23
Portland 4.13% +0.12% $319,300 +1.43 $1,551.84 $66,507.55
Denver 4.13% +0.09% $353,000 -2.73 $1,608.02 $68,915.21
Seattle 4.18% +0.13% $386,300 +0.26 $1,849.95 $79,283.37
Washington 4.07% +0.17% $388,600 -3.76 $1,910.39 $81,873.73
New York City 4.06% +0.09% $410,500 +0.02 $2,134.94 $91,497.39
Boston 4.03% +0.12% $449,000 +8.30 $2,165.26 $92,796.90
Los Angeles 4.06% +0.12% $506,800 +13.84 $2,322.31 $99,527.51
San Diego 4.11% +0.07% $554,400 +1.20 $2,489.57 $106,695.94
San Francisco 3.98% +0.03% $809,400 -1.36 $3,573.55 $153,152.08

Comments

  1. Robin December 26, 2015 5:57 am

    How did you arrive at that number? I mean, I get how you came up with the costs for the house, but how did you determine how much you need to make above that? Because by my math, after taxes, insurance, and conservative 401k pay-ins, $919 is more than an every-two-weeks paycheck. So, they can afford a house, but it's taking more than half of their take home pay? So the other check is supposed to pay all the utilities, car, insurance, gas, food, clothes, phone, furniture, appliances, problems, etc.? I hope they don't get cable and go bankrupt. Maybe they won the down payment in a lottery.

      Reply»  
    1. Editorial Team December 28, 2015 7:38 am

      Hi Robin -- the methodology we use to determine the salary can be found on the last slide. Please know that we use industry standard guidelines regarding how much can be spent on Principal, Interest, Taxes and Insurance (PITI), which can make up no more than 28 percent of the monthly GROSS (pre-tax) income. 401K contributions and other items are not considered in the calculation.

        Reply »  
  2. Vic December 13, 2015 1:31 pm

    Want to retire on the coast near Corpus Christi. Do you have those figures? The wife and I will have an income around 50k. Currently live north of Denver in a 250k home. Balance due should be around 130k when we retire.

      Reply»  
  3. Harsha December 08, 2015 12:43 pm

    Hi,can you give similar numbers for Greater Salt Lake City area?

      Reply»  
  4. michael brumfield December 05, 2015 4:53 am

    Yea I see what the prices are and I'm on disability which brought my income down by $750.00 ever two weeks but I'm permanent disabled. What can I buy on a $1,900.00 dollar a Month income.nothing to put dwn.

      Reply»  
    1. Rebecca Johnson December 14, 2015 6:32 pm

      Check on government programs to provide no downpayment, low interest loans for those in special categories (typically first time buyers with limited income). I was by no means poor but I qualified for a 0 down payment loan in the NYC area. I actually didn't take ti because I wanted to make the down payment and my dad could lend me some money. But there are special programs out there.

        Reply »  
      1. Editorial Team December 16, 2015 9:02 am

        Rebecca, Thanks for letting our readers know these programs work and they can qualify for them. -Tim Manni, HSH.com

    2. Editorial Team December 10, 2015 11:33 am

      Michael, I don't have the rate data readily available, but the median price in SLC Utah is $254,000. That stands to reason that affordability in the SLC area will be close to that of the Baltimore area. Of course, taxes and insurance costs will vary, but that gives you a ballpark. Be sure to contact a local real estate agent to get an exact idea on the price of homes you are interested in. Thanks for your comment, Tim Manni, HSH.com

        Reply »  
  5. GZ December 02, 2015 10:32 pm

    I'm curious as to how you calculated your monthly payments. I used a mortgage payment calculator for your Boston statistics, and for a 30-year, 4.03% fixed rate mortgage with 20% down (Leaving approximately $360,000 to pay off), I found the estimated monthly payment to be much lower at $1,724.93, more than $400 less than your estimate. Why is your's so high? What am I not factoring in?

      Reply»  
    1. Editorial Team December 04, 2015 12:25 pm

      GZ, Thanks for writing in. What you are not factoring in is taxes and insurance. We created metropolitan-area average property tax information using data made available from the Census Bureau's American Community Survey (ACS). We use 2011-2013 ACS 3-year estimates, which are the latest available. We used the latest available data for statewide average homeowner insurance premium costs from the Insurance Information Institute. Note: Property taxes and insurance costs are specific to an individual property itself and will be different for any single property in which you may have an interest. Thanks for writing in with your important question. -Tim Manni, HSH.com

        Reply »  
  6. Brad December 02, 2015 3:55 pm

    I would like buy house in Atlanta

      Reply»  
  7. Sk8er December 02, 2015 9:05 am

    Haven't seen a home selling for $800K in San Francisco in many decades, so looked up the data. Current median home price is about twice that.

      Reply»  
    1. Editorial Team December 02, 2015 9:15 am

      Sk8er, We used the median home price as reported by the National Association of Realtors for the San Francisco metro area, not just the city itself. Thanks for commenting, Tim Manni, HSH.com

        Reply »  
  8. Christopher A December 01, 2015 3:12 pm

    Thanks for sharing and writing about the disparity in home purchasing power the country most working people doesn't know how their salary effects their buying power especially in cities like New York and California and not speaking of the taxes on state, county and local level can create a nightmare.

      Reply»  
  9. Eric November 24, 2015 1:47 pm

    I would really like to see the sqft one would get at these prices.

      Reply»  
    1. Editorial Team November 24, 2015 1:58 pm

      Eric, Thanks for your comment. Unfortunately the data for square footage does not exist. These median-home prices (half sold for more, half sold for less) come from the National Association of Realtors. -Tim Manni, HSH.com

        Reply »  
  10. Jill November 19, 2015 4:51 pm

    At first glance, i assumed that San Jose "Silicon Valley" was included in the SF metro area. But, apparently I was mistaken because the OMB link provided by the editors shows a separate listing for that metro. Population must be too small to include? Based on other statistics I've seen, it tops SF prices by over $100k!!!

      Reply»  

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