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The salary you must earn to buy a home in 27 metros

Buying a home is a daunting task no matter where you live or how much you make, but according to our latest quarterly survey the salary you need to buy a home varies wildly across the country.

Key takeaways:

  • In the second quarter, home prices and mortgage rates increased in every metro area on our list.
  • For the first time in this series, San Diego has become a jumbo-mortgage market.
  • Cleveland remains the most affordable metro area despite a 22.5 percent home-price gain in the second quarter, which is the largest quarterly-gain on our list.
  • The San Francisco metro somehow managed to get even more expensive: the required salary increased by a whopping $16,496 in the second quarter.

See below exactly how much salary you would need to earn in order to afford the principal, interest, taxes and insurance payments on a median-priced home in 27 metro areas:

 

Chicago

How much salary do you need to earn in order to afford the principal and interest payments on a median-priced home in your metro area?

To find out, HSH.com took the National Association of Realtors’ 2015 second-quarter data for median-home prices and HSH.com’s 2015 second-quarter average interest rate for 30-year, fixed-rate mortgages to determine how much of your salary it would take to afford the base cost of owning a home -- the principal, interest, taxes and insurance -- in 27 metro areas.

We used standard 28 percent "front-end" debt ratios and a 20 percent down payment subtracted from the NAR’s median-home-price data to arrive at our figures. We've incorporated available information on property taxes and homeowner’s insurance costs to more accurately reflect the income needed in a given market. Read more about the methodology and inputs on the final slide of this slideshow.

Affordability was down across the country in the second quarter. Home prices increased in every metro area on our list and in 93 percent of the markets tracked by the NAR. Nationally, home prices increased by 10.6 percent in the second quarter and were up over 9 percent for the year.

Home prices weren’t the only component of affordability that increased during the second quarter; mortgage rates were also up in every metro area on our list. The San Diego metro saw the largest quarterly increase at 0.17 percent.

Here’s a current look at how much salary you would need to earn in order to afford the principal, interest, taxes and insurance payments on a median-priced home in your metro area.

Mortgage rate: 3.96 percent

  • Quarterly change: +0.14 percent

Home price: $129,700

  • Quarterly change: +22.47 percent
  • YOY change: +1.41 percent

Monthly payment: $786.66

Salary: $33,714.17

  • Quarterly change: +$4,320.63

Despite a massive home price gain in the second quarter, Cleveland remains the most affordable metro area on our list. Affordability conditions have been a bit volatile in the Cleveland metro of late – in the first quarter Cleveland had the largest quarterly price decline on our list, and now this time they’re sporting the most substantial increase.

Mortgage rate: 3.87 percent

  • Quarterly change: +0.12 percent

Home price: $145,250

  • Quarterly change: +10.88 percent
  • YOY change: +3.82 percent

Monthly payment: $789.57

Salary:  $33,838.57

  • Quarterly change: +$3,051.63

The city of Pittsburgh is quickly growing into a tech hub for growing companies – Money Magazine just named it the best big city in the Northeast. That’s great news for homebuyers in the Pittsburgh metro area. While prices and mortgage rates were up in the second quarter, Pittsburgh remains one of the most affordable metro areas to buy in. Buying a home here could be a great investment for a long time to come.

Mortgage rate: 3.98 percent

  • Quarterly change: +0.12 percent

Home price: $151,900

  • Quarterly change: +12.52 percent
  • YOY change: +3.12 percent

Monthly payment: $848.34

Salary: $36,357.35

  • Quarterly change: +$3,615.71

While Cincinnati did move one spot lower on our list in the second quarter, local Realtors say June's “monthly selling prices” in the metro area were the highest they have been since the late 1980s.

Mortgage rate: 3.94 percent

  • Quarterly change: +0.12 percent

Home price: $157,100

  • Quarterly change: +16.54 percent
  • YOY change: +4.80 percent

Monthly payment: $858.32

Salary: $36,784.94

  • Quarterly change: +$4,178.02

Substantial home-price gains in the second quarter negatively impacted affordability in the St. Louis metro, but overall, St. Louis remains a very affordable area to buy a home, as one can afford a median-priced home for less than $860 a month.

Mortgage rate: 4.05 percent

  • Quarterly change: +0.13 percent

Home price: $152,850

  • Quarterly change: +13.22 percent
  • YOY change: +12.14 percent

Monthly payment: $876.04

Salary: $37,544.40

  • Quarterly change: +$2,641.97

Home prices in the Detroit metro keep going up, up, up. Despite crimped affordability, Detroit home prices are making up for lost time. With the highest mortgage rates on our list for the second quarter, the salary required to purchase a median-priced home was up more than $2,600 in the second quarter.

Mortgage rate: 3.97 percent

  • Quarterly change: +0.13 percent

Home price: $181,500

  • Quarterly change: +14.87 percent
  • YOY change: +9.21 percent

Monthly payment: $918.32

Salary: $39,356.45

  • Quarterly change: +$3,778.61

Back-to-back quarters of higher home prices in Atlanta aren't helping the metro area's problem of a lack of demand among young buyers. According to the Census Bureau, homeownership among those ages 30 to 34 was at an all-time low in the second quarter. Real estate professionals in the Atlanta metro say the fear and uncertainty following the housing crisis has not yet faded.

Mortgage rate: 4.04 percent

  • Quarterly change: +0.13 percent

Home price: $175,000

  • Quarterly change: +12.18 percent 
  • YOY change: +12.18 percent

Monthly payment: $968.06

Salary: $41,488.22

  • Quarterly change: +$3,171.72

Attracting more first-time buyers is a theme playing out in many metro areas across the county, and Tampa is no different. The Tampa metro is more affordable than the national average, something that should certainly appeal to millennial homebuyers. The fact that home-price growth was identical over a quarterly and yearly period shows potential buyers that prices, while on the rise, are stable. Stable home prices are something every buyer in the state of Florida should be looking for.

Mortgage rate: 3.97 percent

  • Quarterly change: +0.15 percent

Home price: $217,900

  • Quarterly change: +5.73 percent 
  • YOY change: +9.72 percent

Monthly payment: $1,007.30

Salary: $43,170.07

  • Quarterly change: +$2,440.47

Phoenix is the first metro area on this list to crack the $200,000-home-price mark and the first to have a monthly payment higher than $1,000. Some have called the Phoenix real estate market “exceptional,” but with an influx of activity comes renewed concerns of repeating the misfortunes the metro-area suffered during the Great Recession.

Mortgage rate: 3.99 percent

  • Quarterly change: +0.13 percent

Home price: $198,000

  • Quarterly change: +6.45 percent
  • YOY change: +8.79 percent

Monthly payment: $1,080.35

Salary: $46,300.92

  • Quarterly change: +$2,008.98

Affordability conditions in the second quarter were most stable in the Orlando metro area as the required salary only rose by about $2,000, the smallest increase on our list. Oddly enough, last quarter the required salary was up over $2,100, the second-highest increase on our list.

Mortgage rate: 3.99 percent

  • Quarterly change: +0.06 percent

Home price: $199,400

  • Quarterly change: +7.96 percent 
  • YOY change: +8.25 percent

Monthly payment: $1,122.15

Salary: $48,092.30

  • Quarterly change: +$3,074.15

As always, San Antonio is the most affordable Texas metro on our list. Mortgage rates helped to keep affordability in check as San Antonio had the smallest quarterly-rate increase in the second quarter. Home prices have been stable on both a quarterly and yearly basis.

Mortgage rate: 3.96 percent

  • Quarterly change: +0.13 percent

Home price: $229,200

  • Quarterly change: +9.46 percent
  • YOY change: +7.66 percent

Monthly payment: $1,189.30

Salary: $50,969.96

  • Quarterly change: +$3,864.87

New research from the University of St. Thomas’ Opus College of Business indicates that the Minneapolis metro area real estate market is as strong as it was before the recession. Home prices in the Minneapolis metro area were up nearly 10 percent in the second quarter following consecutive quarterly price declines.

Mortgage rate: 3.97 percent

  • Quarterly change: +0.12 percent

Home price: $215,200

  • Quarterly change: +11.79 percent 
  • YOY change: +12.49 percent

Monthly payment: $1,235.44

Salary: $52,947.58

  • Quarterly change: +$4,231.95

Strong price growth was the theme in the Dallas metro during the second quarter. On a year-over-year basis, Dallas had the second highest gain on our list. Combine strong price growth with higher mortgage rates and the required salary to purchase in the Dallas metro increased by $4,232.

Mortgage rate: 3.94 percent

  • Quarterly change: +0.07 percent

Home price: $221,100

  • Quarterly change: +10.38 percent 
  • YOY change: +8.38 percent

Monthly payment: $1,252.64

Salary: $53,684.45

  • Quarterly change: +$4,044.81

Despite one of the smallest quarterly rate increases on our list, the required salary in the Houston metro was up over $4,000 thanks to strong price growth in the second quarter. High rents and low rates continue to drive sales in the Houston market.

Mortgage rate: 3.96 percent

  • Quarterly change: +0.08 percent

Home price: $231,700

  • Quarterly change: +13.08 percent
  • YOY change: +1.98 percent

Monthly payment: $1,269.00

Salary: $54,385.77

  • Quarterly change: +$5,609.41

Philadelphia is back in the place it usually occupies on our list (it swapped places with the Houston metro last quarter). The required-salary increase of $5,609 in the second quarter is the highest on our list so far. But while home prices in the Philly metro jumped in the second quarter, the yearly numbers suggest a lack of consistent growth.

Mortgage rate: 3.89 percent

  • Quarterly change: +0.07 percent

Home price: $254,500

  • Quarterly change: +14.07 percent
  • YOY change: -0.43 percent

Monthly payment: $1,303.00

Salary: $55,842.76

  • Quarterly change: +$5,572.44

Much like the Philadelphia metro, home prices in the Baltimore metro paint a picture of volatility. Baltimore is the only metro area on our list to see a year-over-year price decline. Again, like its Northeast counterpart, a price leap in the second quarter drove the required salary figure higher by over $5,500.  

Mortgage rate: 3.97 percent

  • Quarterly change: +0.08 percent

Home price: $230,500

  • Quarterly change: +19.74 percent 
  • YOY change: +5.73 percent

Monthly payment: $1,424.93

Salary: $61,068.50

  • Quarterly change: +$7,598.33

If you thought affordability eroded quickly in the Philadelphia and Baltimore metro areas in the second quarter, check out Chicago. With a massive quarterly-price increase, only second to Cleveland, the required salary in the Windy City metro was up over $7,500. The only other metro areas on our list to have that kind of salary increase have median-home prices twice that of Chicago.

Mortgage rate: 4.03 percent

  • Quarterly change: +0.07 percent

Home price: $291,000

  • Quarterly change: +5.51 percent
  • YOY change: +7.38 percent

Monthly payment: $1,435.41

Salary: $61,517.63

  • Quarterly change: +$3,029.42

Market observers in the Sacramento metro say the housing market there is no longer being driven by cash sales on distressed properties. Despite limited inventory, local appraiser Ryan Lundquist said the sales volume in June was the highest it has been in three years. Homebuyers in the Sacramento metro can be thankful that price increases were relatively modest in the second quarter, keeping the salary increase to a minimum.

Mortgage rate: 4.00 percent

  • Quarterly change: +0.13 percent

Home price: $289,900

  • Quarterly change: +7.73 percent
  • YOY change: 7.37 percent

Monthly payment: $1,476.76

Salary: $63,289.86

  • Quarterly change: +$3,420.10

The Miami metro swapped places with Portland, Oregon in the second quarter as the 18th-most affordable metro area on our list. Affordability is going to be as important as ever in the Miami area as RealtyTrac predicts that Miami and Phoenix will see the greatest return of boomerang borrowers – borrowers who lost their homes during the recession but are back and ready to buy again.

Mortgage rate: 4.01 percent

  • Quarterly change: +0.14 percent

Home price: $314,800

  • Quarterly change: +8.78 percent 
  • YOY change: +9.99 percent

Monthly payment: $1,516.89

Salary: $65,009.41

  • Quarterly change: +$5,580.70

According to local sources, there’s a bit of a real estate dichotomy happening in the city of Portland versus its surrounding communities. While the real estate market in the city of Portland is red hot, surrounding towns aren’t seeing the “frenzied” activity that is occurring in the city itself. Consistent price growth means conditions are only getting more expensive in the metro area overall.

Mortgage rate: 4.04 percent

  • Quarterly change: +0.16 percent

Home price: $362,900

  • Quarterly change: +7.34 percent
  • YOY change: +14.73 percent

Monthly payment: $1,631.29

Salary: $69,912.24

  • Quarterly change: +$5,354.19

It has been no secret that the Denver metro area has been one of the strongest real estate markets in the country for a few years now. Yearly price gains in the Denver area are the highest on our list. While local Realtors say things have slowed a bit in the Denver metro, more homes are coming on the market to meet the continued demand. 

Mortgage rate: 4.05 percent

  • Quarterly change: +0.10 percent

Home price: $385,300

  • Quarterly change: +9.34 percent
  • YOY change: +7.81 percent

Monthly payment: $1,801.46

Salary: $77,205.63

  • Quarterly change: +$5,502.82

Price growth in Seattle continues to be a pillar of consistency. Combine the highest mortgage rates on our list with quarterly price growth just under 10 percent and what you are left with is a required salary that is over $5,500 higher than in the first three months of the year.

Mortgage rate: 3.90 percent

  • Quarterly change: +0.12 percent

Home price: $403,800

  • Quarterly change: +9.79 percent
  • YOY change: +0.05 percent

Monthly payment: $1,937.30

Salary: $83,027.24

  • Quarterly change: +$7,049.06

Each quarter, it seems that the D.C. metro area has some of the lowest mortgage rates on our list. The second quarter was no different. Last time we noted that home prices have been falling in the nation’s capitol since the second quarter of 2014. While that trend was reversed in the second quarter of 2015, the year-over-year numbers make you wonder if recent price growth is an outlier or the start of a new trend.

Mortgage rate: 3.91 percent

  • Quarterly change: +0.11 percent

Home price: $414,600

  • Quarterly change: +10.68 percent
  • YOY change: +4.14 percent

Monthly payment: $2,010.50

Salary: $86,164.15

  • Quarterly change: +$9,015.67

At this point on our list, the Boston metro holds the title of the largest salary increase in the second quarter at over $9,000. Recent research ranked Boston as the “healthiest” housing market in the country, with the smallest pool of underwater homes and low interest rates. While the Boston metro has been a “healthy” market over the last few years, “expensive” may be a better adjective to describe it.

Mortgage rate: 3.94 percent

  • Quarterly change: +0.11 percent

Home price: $445,200

  • Quarterly change: +3.13 percent
  • YOY change: +5.92 percent

Monthly payment: $2,060.69

Salary: $88,315.32

  • Quarterly change: +$3,714.92

Speaking of high-cost metros, Los Angeles actually had the smallest quarterly-price increase on our entire list. Modest rates and a minimal quarterly-price increase were the reasons the required salary in the Los Angeles metro was up only by $3,715.

Mortgage rate: 3.97 percent

  • Quarterly change: +0.07 percent

Home price: $410,400

  • Quarterly change: +6.60 percent
  • YOY change: +3.45 percent

Monthly payment: $2,117.50

Salary: $90,750.14

  • Quarterly change: +$6,091.96

New York is another high-priced metro area that experienced soft increases during the second quarter.  During the first quarter, the Big Apple had the largest quarterly-rate decline. This quarter, while rates were on the rise, the increase was among the lowest on our list.

Mortgage rate: 4.04 percent

  • Quarterly change: +0.17 percent

Home price: $547,800

  • Quarterly change: +7.35 percent
  • YOY change: +8.65 percent

Monthly payment: $2,446.26

Salary: $104,839.73

  • Quarterly change: +$8,434.93

For the first time in this series, the San Diego metro area has become a jumbo mortgage market. The combination of a strong price gain and the largest quarterly-rate gain on our list propelled San Diego over the jumbo line.

Mortgage rate: 3.95 (jumbo rate)

  • Quarterly change: +0.07 percent

Home price: $841,600

  • Quarterly change: +12.47 percent
  • YOY change: +9.36 percent

Monthly payment: $3,684.61

Salary: $157,912.06

  • Quarterly change: +$16,495.52

Somehow, some way, the San Francisco metro area has become even more unaffordable. Sorry Boston, but your second-quarter salary increase of $9,000 pales in comparison to the $16,496 increase in the San Francisco metro. Home prices just keep on rising.

To compile these results, HSH.com calculated the annual before-tax income required to cover the mortgage's principal, interest, tax and insurance payment. We used standard 28 percent "front-end" debt ratios and a 20 percent down payment subtracted from the median-home-price data to arrive at our figures. Loans with less than a 20 percent down payment will incur mortgage insurance, which would in turn increase the required salary and require Private Mortgage Insurance.

We utilized the NAR's 2015 second-quarter data for median home prices and our 2015 second-quarter average interest rate for a 30-year, fixed-rate mortgage to determine how much money homebuyers in 27 major metro areas would need to earn in order to purchase the median-priced home in their market.

The average mortgage rate information we used was for purchase-money mortgages made to borrowers with good to excellent credit.

We created metropolitan-area average property tax information using data made available from the Census Bureau's American Community Survey (ACS). We use 2011-2013 ACS 3-year estimates, which are the latest available data.]

We used the latest available data for statewide average homeowner insurance premium costs from the Insurance Information Institute (http://www.iii.org), whose mission is to improve public understanding of insurance.

Note: Property taxes and insurance costs are specific to an individual property itself and will be different for any single property in which you may have an interest. Also, if other personal debts exceed 8 percent of one's given monthly gross income, this will increase the salary needed to qualify.

Data for the Pittsburgh metro area was provided by RealSTATs, a locally owned and operated real estate information company. Home-price data for Detroit was provided by Realcomp II Ltd., Michigan's largest Multiple Listing Service.

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How much salary do you need to earn in order to afford the principal, interest, taxes and insurance payments on a median-priced home in your metro area?

Cleveland Pittsburgh St. Louis Cincinnati Detroit Atlanta Tampa Phoenix Orlando San Antonio Minneapolis Dallas Houston Philadelphia Chicago Baltimore Sacramento Miami Denver Portland Seattle Washington Boston Los Angeles New York City San Diego San Francisco

Cities 30-Year Fixed Mortgage Rate % Change from 1Q15 Median Home Price % Change from 1Q15 Monthly Payment (PITI) Salary Needed
Cleveland 3.96% 0.14% $129,700 +22.47 $786.66 $33,714.17
Pittsburgh 3.87% 0.12% $145,250 +10.88 $789.57 $33,838.57
Cincinnati 3.98% 0.12% $151,900 +12.52 $848.34 $36,357.35
St Louis 3.94% 0.12% $157,100 +16.54 $858.32 $36,784.94
Detroit 4.05% 0.13% $152,850 +13.22 $876.04 $37,544.40
Atlanta 3.97% 0.13% $181,500 +14.87 $918.32 $39,356.45
Tampa 4.04% 0.13% $175,000 +12.18 $968.06 $41,488.22
Phoenix 3.97% 0.15% $217,900 +5.73 $1,007.30 $43,170.07
Orlando 3.99% 0.13% $198,000 +6.45 $1,080.35 $46,300.92
San Antonio 3.99% 0.06% $199,400 +7.96 $1,122.15 $48,092.30
Minneapolis 3.96% 0.13% $229,200 +9.46 $1,189.30 $50,969.96
Dallas 3.97% 0.12% $215,200 +11.79 $1,235.44 $52,947.58
Houston 3.94% 0.07% $221,100 +10.38 $1,252.64 $53,684.45
Philadelphia 3.96% 0.08% $231,700 +13.08 $1,269.00 $54,385.77
Baltimore 3.89% 0.07% $254,500 +14.07 $1,303.00 $55,842.76
Chicago 3.97% 0.08% $230,500 +19.74 $1,424.93 $61,068.50
Sacramento 4.03% 0.07% $291,000 +5.51 $1,435.41 $61,517.63
Miami 4.00% 0.13% $289,900 +7.73 $1,476.76 $63,289.86
Portland 4.01% 0.14% $314,800 +8.78 $1,516.89 $65,009.41
Denver 4.04% 0.16% $362,900 +7.34 $1,631.29 $69,912.24
Seattle 4.05% 0.10% $385,300 +9.34 $1,822.78 $78,118.97
Washington 3.90% 0.12% $403,800 +9.79 $1,937.30 $83,027.24
Boston 3.91% 0.11% $414,600 +10.68 $2,010.50 $86,164.15
Los Angeles 3.94% 0.11% $445,200 +3.13 $2,060.69 $88,315.32
New York City 3.97% 0.07% $410,400 +6.60 $2,117.50 $90,750.14
San Diego 4.04% 0.17% $547,800 +7.35 $2,446.26 $104,839.73
San Francisco 3.95% 0.07% $841,600 +12.47 $3,684.61 $157,912.06

Comments

  1. Mary September 02, 2015 12:53 am

    These mortgage payments are based on what type of downpayment? 20%? I do not see PMI incorporated and there is a higher percentage of buyers that do not have 20% to put down.

      Reply»  
    1. Editorial Team September 02, 2015 6:27 am

      Mary, Thanks for writing in. Yes, as the first slide explains we use 20% down because PMI costs complicate the calculations. But it's a fair point that smaller down payments are realistic options for borrowers these days. We're always looking for ways to improve this model so thanks again for your suggestion. -Tim Manni, HSH.com

        Reply »  
  2. Gordon August 31, 2015 4:58 pm

    Good data and a basic feel for the differences / discrepancies nationwide between markets that have been growing since the "recovery". The reponses are stimulating and entertaining. Keep up the good work!

      Reply»  
  3. ALan August 30, 2015 11:27 am

    Not sure if this data really works as it excludes taxes and insurance and related maintenance expenses and simply defines 28% of income as the affordability factor. These highly variable costs from market to market have a significant impact on affordability.

      Reply»  
    1. Editorial Team August 31, 2015 7:30 am

      Alan, Thanks for writing in. We disagree with you that our data doesn't work because it clearly states in the intro, in slide one, and even on the final slide that this is the salary you would need to earn in order to afford the principal, interest, taxes and insurance payments... This is just the salary you need to afford those items (not including maintenance, utility bills, spending money, etc.). You are correct in that utility bills and maintenance costs will vary with the location and condition of the home. That is why we could not include them. Borrowers must be cognoscente of those costs. Think of it this way, when applying for a loan, your lender doesn't factor in your cable or cellphone bill -- they don't care if you watch HBO or have the latest iphone. Again, you're spot on with the fact that all potential borrowers need to consider all the other costs that go into owning a home besides simply the monthly payment. Thanks again for writing in, Tim Manni (HSH.com)

        Reply »  
      1. jim September 01, 2015 6:43 pm

        I'm not sure if cognoscente is the word you meant to use. I believe that cognizant would be a better choice.

        1. Editorial Team September 02, 2015 6:15 am

          Jim, Thanks for your sharp eyes. -Tim Manni, HSH.com

  4. Bill August 26, 2015 3:06 pm

    This is based on avg. home prices sold, which is good. However, do you have anything on new vs. used?

      Reply»  
    1. Editorial Team August 27, 2015 7:01 am

      Joe, Thanks for writing in. Just as a reminder, this is existing median home sales as reported by the Realtors. There are new-home sale numbers out there, but it's a national number, not broken down by metro. There is no new-vs-used comparison data that we know of. We try to utilize the best data sets that are available to us. Thanks again for writing in, Tim Manni, HSH.com

        Reply »  
  5. Joe August 25, 2015 2:18 pm

    Given the disparity in home size, neighborhood etc, price /sf would be a more useful comparison in this analysis.

      Reply»  
    1. Editorial Team August 26, 2015 8:31 am

      Joe, Thanks for writing in. As I have mentioned in other comments, we are working with the data sets that are available -- the NAR doesn't publish home price and square footage, no home price source that I know of does. And if the NAR did publish price and square footage, it would likely be median square footage. If you have a home price you would like us to calculate a salary for just let us know. Thanks, Tim Manni, HSH.com

        Reply »  
  6. William August 25, 2015 7:02 am

    Charlotte is #17; above Seattle, Portland, Detroit or Denver.

      Reply»  
    1. Editorial Team August 25, 2015 7:10 am

      William,We are going to work on getting Charlotte in the next go round. Thanks for writing in, Tim Manni, HSH.com

        Reply »  
  7. mark August 24, 2015 7:45 pm

    So... this article is bogus... what about what you get for your money. Tiny House... What a joke.

      Reply»  
    1. Editorial Team August 25, 2015 7:18 am

      Mark, Sorry to hear that you found this content "bogus." The data speaks for itself, though: it's metro area median home prices. Half the houses sold for more, half sold for less. I'm not sure where you live, but this data doesn't produce a salary for just the city, but rather the surrounding areas which define the given metro area. If you have a home price in mind we could calculate the required salary for you in hopes of making this content more actionable for you. We're happy to oblige, thanks, Tim Manni, HSH.com

        Reply »  
  8. budy July 21, 2015 11:58 pm

    Weew.....Los Angles is fine...

      Reply»  
  9. usuck July 18, 2015 5:33 am

    Put Indianapolis on your list. It's the 14th biggest city.

      Reply»  
  10. Elka Jaross July 17, 2015 8:28 am

    Where are the statistics for Austin, Texas. It seemingly has the highest market but least affordable. Thank you for your answer

      Reply»  
    1. Editorial Team July 17, 2015 9:35 am

      Elka, thanks for your comment. We are always looking for ways to improve our salary slideshow. So far, we have examined 27 cities in the US with the highest populations. I'm not sure what you mean by "[Austin] seemingly has the highest market but least affordable." What did you mean by "highest market"? Thanks again for writing in, looking forward to hearing back from you. -Tim Manni (author)

        Reply »  
      1. Heather Wakefield August 25, 2015 10:30 am

        Elka is pointing out that Austin should be on your list. You state that you examined 27 cities in the US with the highest populations. Austin is the 11th largest city in the US. Many other cities with smaller populations are on your list yet you have excluded Austin.

        1. Editorial Team August 25, 2015 11:10 am

          Heather, Thanks for writing in. We understand the point you and Elka are trying to make, but for this project we are using the largest metropolitan areas, since metro areas is what the National Association of Realtors uses to track their home prices. While Austin is the 11th largest city in the U.S., it is the 36th largest metro area. We truly appreciate your interest and we hope that we can start adding more metro areas to this slideshow. Thanks for writing, Tim

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