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The salary you must earn to buy a home in 27 metros

See below exactly how much salary you would need to earn in order to afford the principal, interest, taxes and insurance payments on a median-priced home in 27 metro areas.

Key takeaways:

  • Compared to the fourth quarter, the median value of a home sold in the first quarter of 2017 was lower in 17 of the 27 markets we review for our calculations. However, this decline in cost this wasn't enough to offset the considerable increase in 30-year fixed mortgage rates, so the salary needed to purchase that median home rose yet again in all but 5 markets.
  • Quarterly slippage notwithstanding, home prices were higher in all markets on a year-over-year basis, sometimes substantially so. Of the metro areas in our study, those increases ranged from 0.04 percent in the Pittsburgh metro to a whopping 13.3 percent gain in the Cleveland metro market. Four markets featured double-digit increases, but there are plenty of mid- and high single-digit gains to be seen as well.
  • Not surprisingly, rising home prices and higher mortgage rates meant that the income needed to purchase a median-priced single family home in the first quarter of 2017 was higher than the same period in 2016. In this comparison, salaries in all markets were higher, and the average increase for all markets covered was over 9 percent.
  • Mortgage rates rose considerably during the first quarter of 2017 relative to the last quarter of 2016.
  • For this quarter, our analysis includes updated cost factors for Private Mortgage Insurance.

PLEASE SEE: Metro area definitions

 

Chicago

How much salary do you need to earn in order to afford the principal, interest, tax and insurance payments on a median-priced home in your metro area?

For our calculations, HSH.com uses the National Association of Realtors’ 2017 first-quarter data for median-home prices, national mortgage rate data derived from weekly surveys by Freddie Mac and the Mortgage Bankers Association of America for 30-year fixed rate mortgages and available property tax and homeowners insurance costs to determine the annual salary it takes to afford the base cost of owning a home (principal, interest, property tax and homeowner's insurance, or PITI) in the nation's 27 largest metropolitan areas. 

We used standard 28 percent "front-end" debt ratios and a 20 percent down payment subtracted from the NAR’s median-home-price data to arrive at our figures. We've incorporated available information on property taxes and homeowner’s insurance costs to more accurately reflect the income needed in a given market. Read more about the methodology and inputs on the final slide of this slideshow.

In the commentary section of each slide, we provide data to show how the required salary would change if you were to make a 10 percent down payment instead of a 20 percent. As we work from a fixed median home price, a smaller down payment means both a larger loan amount and the need to pay for private mortgage insurance, which in turn means even higher salary requirements.

First-quarter analysis: Winter months are usually a slower time for home sales, but that wasn't the case to start 2017. "The strongest quarterly sales pace in exactly a decade" noted the National Association of Realtors in their quarterly home-price release.

Lawrence Yun, NAR chief economist, says continual supply shortages ignited faster price appreciation across the country in the first quarter. “Prospective buyers poured into the market to start the year, and while their increased presence led to a boost in sales, new listings failed to keep up and hovered around record lows all quarter,” he said. “Those able to successfully buy most likely had to outbid others – especially for those in the starter-home market – which in turn quickened price growth to the fastest quarterly pace in almost two years.”

That said, in at least 10 of the 27 markets for which we produce a salary needed to buy a median priced home, that median price was lower in the first quarter of 2017 than it was in the final quarter of last year. That said, prices to start 2017 are considerably above where they were in the first quarter of 2016, with a number of markets sporting double digit increases in price by that comparison.

Thin inventories of available homes remain; inventories have remained at 4 months or fewer for the last 4 months, so finding desirable, affordable homes will continue to be a challenge in a number of places.

Added Yun, “Several metro areas with the healthiest job gains in recent years continue to see a large upswing in buyer demand but lack the commensurate ramp up in new home construction. This is why many of these areas – in particular several parts of the South and West – are seeing unhealthy price appreciation that far exceeds incomes.”

Here’s a current look at how much salary you would need to earn in order to afford the principal, interest, taxes and insurance payments on a median-priced home in your metro area.

Mortgage rate:  4.29 percent

  • Quarterly change: 0.32 percent

Home price:  $120,000

  •  Quarterly change: -7.69 percent
  •  Year-over-year change: +0.04 percent

Monthly payment:  $735.18

Salary:  $31,507.71

  •  Quarterly change: -$865.79
  •  Year-over-year change: +6.87 percent

If homebuyers in the Pittsburgh metro put 10 percent down instead of 20 percent, the required salary increases from $31,507.71 to $35,631.17.

Mortgage rate:  4.29 percent

  • Quarterly change: 0.32 percent

Home price:  $126,100

  • Quarterly change: -3.74 percent
  • Year-over-year change: +13.30 percent

Monthly payment:  $788.30

Salary:  $33,784.32

  • Quarterly change: $4.88
  • Year-over-year change: +10.78 percent

If homebuyers in the Cleveland metro put 10 percent down instead of 20 percent, the required salary increases from $33,784.32 to $38,117.40.

Mortgage rate:  4.29 percent

  • Quarterly change: 0.32 percent

Home price:  $145,400

  • Quarterly change: -3.84 percent
  • Year-over-year change: +5.52 percent

Monthly payment:  $851.70

Salary:  $36,501.50

  • Quarterly change: -$18.85
  • Year-over-year change: +8.04 percent

If homebuyers in the Cincinnati metro put 10 percent down instead of 20 percent, the required salary increases from $36,501.50 to $41,741.21.

Mortgage rate:  4.29 percent

  • Quarterly change: 0.32 percent

Home price:  $145,000

  • Quarterly change: -11.93 percent
  • Year-over-year change: +2.09 percent

Monthly payment:  $858.95

Salary:  $36,812.29

  • Quarterly change: -$2,280.24
  • Year-over-year change: +3.59 percent

If homebuyers in the Detroit metro put 10 percent down instead of 20 percent, the required salary increases from $36,812.29 to $41,794.81.

Mortgage rate:  4.29 percent

  • Quarterly change: 0.32 percent

Home price:  $154,900

  • Quarterly change: -3.67 percent
  • Year-over-year change: +4.80 percent

Monthly payment:  $885.43

Salary:  $37,947.17

  • Quarterly change: $25.42
  • Year-over-year change: +8.29 percent

If homebuyers in the St Louis metro put 10 percent down instead of 20 percent, the required salary increases from $37,947.17 to $43,269.88.

Mortgage rate:  4.29 percent

  • Quarterly change: 0.32 percent

Home price:  $182,800

  • Quarterly change: -0.05 percent
  • Year-over-year change: +8.94 percent

Monthly payment:  $950.26

Salary:  $40,725.36

  • Quarterly change: $1,149.25
  • Year-over-year change: +10.59 percent

If homebuyers in the Atlanta metro put 10 percent down instead of 20 percent, the required salary increases from $40,725.36 to $47,006.77.

Mortgage rate:  4.29 percent

  • Quarterly change: 0.32 percent

Home price:  $237,900

  • Quarterly change: 0.98 percent
  • Year-over-year change: +6.63 percent

Monthly payment:  $1,115.47

Salary:  $47,805.95

  • Quarterly change: $1,892.00
  • Year-over-year change: +9.48 percent

If homebuyers in the Phoenix metro put 10 percent down instead of 20 percent, the required salary increases from $47,805.95 to $55,980.72

Mortgage rate:  4.29 percent

  • Quarterly change: 0.32 percent

Home price:  $207,500

  • Quarterly change: 1.22 percent
  • Year-over-year change: +14.01 percent

Monthly payment:  $1,119.51

Salary:  $47,979.10

  • Quarterly change: $1,730.78
  • Year-over-year change: +12.81 percent

If homebuyers in the Tampa metro put 10 percent down instead of 20 percent, the required salary increases from $47,979.10 to $55,109.25.

Mortgage rate:  4.29 percent

  • Quarterly change: 0.32 percent

Home price:  $202,600

  • Quarterly change: -1.79 percent
  • Year-over-year change: +3.63 percent

Monthly payment:  $1,186.47

Salary:  $50,848.70

  • Quarterly change: $688.36
  • Year-over-year change: +8.20 percent

If homebuyers in the San Antonio metro put 10 percent down instead of 20 percent, the required salary increases from $50,848.70 to $57,810.48.

Mortgage rate:  4.29 percent

  • Quarterly change: 0.32 percent

Home price:  $209,000

  • Quarterly change: -5.69 percent
  • Year-over-year change: +2.50 percent

Monthly payment:  $1,221.61

Salary:  $52,354.73

  • Quarterly change: -$722.36
  • Year-over-year change: +5.60 percent

If homebuyers in the Philadelphia metro put 10 percent down instead of 20 percent, the required salary increases from $52,354.73 to $59,536.43.

Mortgage rate:  4.29 percent

  • Quarterly change: 0.32 percent

Home price:  $230,000

  • Quarterly change: 1.01 percent
  • Year-over-year change: +10.05 percent

Monthly payment:  $1,229.98

Salary:  $52,713.58

  • Quarterly change: $1,841.62
  • Year-over-year change: +10.06 percent

If homebuyers in the Orlando metro put 10 percent down instead of 20 percent, the required salary increases from $52,713.58 to $60,616.88.

Mortgage rate:  4.29 percent

  • Quarterly change: 0.32 percent

Home price:  $234,700

  • Quarterly change: -0.21 percent
  • Year-over-year change: +5.96 percent

Monthly payment:  $1,254.90

Salary:  $53,781.51

  • Quarterly change: $1,414.93
  • Year-over-year change: +9.13 percent

If homebuyers in the Minneapolis metro put 10 percent down instead of 20 percent, the required salary increases from $53,781.51 to $61,846.32.

Mortgage rate:  4.29 percent

  • Quarterly change: 0.32 percent

Home price:  $237,600

  • Quarterly change: -3.38 percent
  • Year-over-year change: +3.66 percent

Monthly payment:  $1,281.37

Salary:  $54,915.83

  • Quarterly change: $161.30
  • Year-over-year change: +6.29 percent

If homebuyers in the Baltimore metro put 10 percent down instead of 20 percent, the required salary increases from $54,915.83 to $63,080.29.

.

Mortgage rate:  4.29 percent

  • Quarterly change: 0.32 percent

Home price:  $222,300

  • Quarterly change: -0.98 percent
  • Year-over-year change: +6.88 percent

Monthly payment:  $1,296.12

Salary:  $55,547.95

  • Quarterly change: $1,058.61
  • Year-over-year change: +8.09 percent

If homebuyers in the Houston metro put 10 percent down instead of 20 percent, the required salary increases from $55,547.95 to $63,186.67.

Mortgage rate:  4.29 percent

  • Quarterly change: 0.32 percent

Home price:  $236,500

  • Quarterly change: 2.56 percent
  • Year-over-year change: +12.57 percent

Monthly payment:  $1,362.60

Salary:  $58,397.27

  • Quarterly change: $2,470.20
  • Year-over-year change: +12.68 percent

If homebuyers in the Dallas metro put 10 percent down instead of 20 percent, the required salary increases from $58,397.27 to $66,523.93.

Mortgage rate:  4.29 percent

  • Quarterly change: 0.32 percent

Home price:  $228,600

  • Quarterly change: 0.93 percent
  • Year-over-year change: +9.59 percent

Monthly payment:  $1,386.20

Salary:  $59,408.47

  • Quarterly change: $1,800.08
  • Year-over-year change: +3.92 percent

If homebuyers in the Chicago metro put 10 percent down instead of 20 percent, the required salary increases from $59,408.47 to $67,263.66.

Mortgage rate:  4.29 percent

  • Quarterly change: 0.32 percent

Home price:  $319,700

  • Quarterly change: 0.22 percent
  • Year-over-year change: +7.64 percent

Monthly payment:  $1,589.85

Salary:  $68,136.37

  • Quarterly change: $2,152.61
  • Year-over-year change: +9.94 percent

If homebuyers in the Sacramento metro put 10 percent down instead of 20 percent, the required salary increases from $68,136.37 to $79,121.97.

Mortgage rate:  4.29 percent

  • Quarterly change: 0.32 percent

Home price:  $318,000

  • Quarterly change: 2.42 percent
  • Year-over-year change: +10.96 percent

Monthly payment:  $1,637.63

Salary:  $70,183.99

  • Quarterly change: $3,250.81
  • Year-over-year change: +12.56 percent

If homebuyers in the Miami metro put 10 percent down instead of 20 percent, the required salary increases from $70,183.99 to $81,111.17.

Mortgage rate:  4.29 percent

  • Quarterly change: 0.32 percent

Home price:  $359,900

  • Quarterly change: 1.47 percent
  • Year-over-year change: +10.16 percent

Monthly payment:  $1,727.56

Salary:  $74,038.31

  • Quarterly change: $3,142.85
  • Year-over-year change: +11.11 percent

If homebuyers in the Portland metro put 10 percent down instead of 20 percent, the required salary increases from $74,038.31 to $86,405.26.

Mortgage rate:  4.29 percent

  • Quarterly change: 0.32 percent

Home price:  $396,100

  • Quarterly change: 3.80 percent
  • Year-over-year change: +7.34 percent

Monthly payment:  $1,812.12

Salary:  $77,662.37

  • Quarterly change: $4,890.43
  • Year-over-year change: +10.65 percent

If homebuyers in the Denver metro put 10 percent down instead of 20 percent, the required salary increases from $77,662.37 to $91,273.24.

Mortgage rate:  4.29 percent

  • Quarterly change: 0.32 percent

Home price:  $383,500

  • Quarterly change: -0.21 percent
  • Year-over-year change: +4.10 percent

Monthly payment:  $1,926.05

Salary:  $82,544.92

  • Quarterly change: $2,314.77
  • Year-over-year change: +6.98 percent

If homebuyers in the Washington metro put 10 percent down instead of 20 percent, the required salary increases from $82,544.92 to $95,722.82.

Mortgage rate:  4.29 percent

  • Quarterly change: 0.32 percent

Home price:  $422,100

  • Quarterly change: -0.28 percent
  • Year-over-year change: +10.18 percent

Monthly payment:  $2,017.52

Salary:  $86,465.00

  • Quarterly change: $2,495.65
  • Year-over-year change: +11.53 percent

If homebuyers in the Seattle metro put 10 percent down instead of 20 percent, the required salary increases from $86,465.00 to $98,585.66.

Mortgage rate:  4.29 percent

  • Quarterly change: 0.32 percent

Home price:  $414,200

  • Quarterly change: -0.77 percent
  • Year-over-year change: +9.43 percent

Monthly payment:  $2,133.11

Salary:  $91,419.05

  • Quarterly change: $2,119.10
  • Year-over-year change: +14.88 percent

If homebuyers in the Boston metro put 10 percent down instead of 20 percent, the required salary increases from $91,419.05 to $105,651.87.

Mortgage rate:  4.29 percent

  • Quarterly change: 0.32 percent

Home price:  $386,000

  • Quarterly change: 0.97 percent
  • Year-over-year change: +3.51 percent

Monthly payment:  $2,233.68

Salary:  $95,729.31

  • Quarterly change: $3,064.63
  • Year-over-year change: +14.10 percent

If homebuyers in the New York City metro put 10 percent down instead of 20 percent, the required salary increases from $95,729.31 to $108,993.12.

Mortgage rate:  4.29 percent

  • Quarterly change: 0.32 percent

Home price:  $485,800

  • Quarterly change: -4.11 percent
  • Year-over-year change: +5.75 percent

Monthly payment:  $2,299.32

Salary:  $98,542.31

  • Quarterly change: -$294.81
  • Year-over-year change: +9.17 percent

If homebuyers in the Los Angeles metro put 10 percent down instead of 20 percent, the required salary increases from $98,542.31 to $115,235.47.

Mortgage rate:  4.36 percent

  • Quarterly change: 0.26 percent

Home price:  $564,000

  • Quarterly change: -0.70 percent
  • Year-over-year change: +5.03 percent

Monthly payment:  $2,605.53

Salary:  $111,665.80

  • Quarterly change: $2,277.07
  • Year-over-year change: +9.81 percent

If homebuyers in the San Diego metro put 10 percent down instead of 20 percent, the required salary increases from $111,665.80 to $132,233.29.

Mortgage rate:  4.36 percent

  • Quarterly change: 0.26 percent

Home price:  $815,000

  • Quarterly change: -1.81 percent
  • Year-over-year change: +6.54 percent

Monthly payment:  $3,759.24

Salary:  $161,110.33

  • Quarterly change: $1,763.01
  • Year-over-year change: +12.39 percent

If homebuyers in the San Francisco metro put 10 percent down instead of 20 percent, the required salary increases from $161,110.33 to $190,831.09.

To compile these results, HSH.com calculates the annual before-tax income required to cover the mortgage's principal, interest, property tax and homeowner's insurance payment. We use standard 28 percent "front-end" debt ratios and a 20 percent down payment subtracted from the median-home-price data to arrive at our figures. Loans with less than a 20 percent down payment will incur mortgage insurance, which would in turn increase the required salary and require Private Mortgage Insurance. Results using smaller down payments and including PMI costs are provided on each market's slide.

We utilized the National Association of Realtors 2017 first-quarter data for median home prices. For mortgage data, we create a quarterly average of mortgage rates from survey data published by Freddie Mac (conforming loans) and the Mortgage Bankers Association of America (jumbo loans) for a 30-year, fixed-rate mortgage.

The average mortgage rate information we used was for purchase-money mortgages made to borrowers with good to excellent credit.

Into our calculations, we incorporate metropolitan-area average property tax information using data made available from the Census Bureau's American Community Survey (ACS). We use 2010-2015 ACS 5-year estimates, which are the latest available data.

For homeowner's insurance costs, we use the latest available data for statewide average homeowner insurance premium costs from the Insurance Information Institute (http://www.iii.org), whose mission is to improve public understanding of insurance.

Note: Property taxes and insurance costs are specific to an individual property itself and will be different for any single property in which you may have an interest. Also, if other personal debts exceed 8 percent of one's given monthly gross income, this will increase the salary needed to qualify.

PMI costs used in our calculations are for 30-year fixed-rate mortgages. For conforming loan amounts, these are costs for FICO scores of greater than 740 but less than 759; for jumbo loan amounts, these costs are for FICO scores of 760 or greater. You can calculate mortgage insurance costs for other credit scores, down payment amounts and mortgage types using HSH.com's PMI Cost Calculator.

Data for the Pittsburgh metro area was provided by RealSTATs, a locally owned and operated real estate information company. Home-price data for Detroit was provided by Realcomp II Ltd., Michigan's largest Multiple Listing Service.

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How much salary do you need to earn in order to afford the principal, interest, taxes and insurance payments on a median-priced home in your metro area?

salary you need to earn in order to afford home in 27 metro areas
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Metro Area 30-Year Fixed Mortgage Rate % Change from 4Q16 Median Home Price % Change from 4Q16 Monthly Payment (PITI) Salary Needed
National 4.29% 0.32% $232,100 -1.40 $1,235.95 $52,969.46
Pittsburgh 4.29% 0.32% $120,000 -7.69 $735.18 $31,507.71
Cleveland 4.29% 0.32% $126,100 -3.74 $788.30 $33,784.32
Cincinnati 4.29% 0.32% $145,400 -3.84 $851.70 $36,501.50
Detroit 4.29% 0.32% $145,000 -11.93 $858.95 $36,812.29
St Louis 4.29% 0.32% $154,900 -3.67 $885.43 $37,947.17
Atlanta 4.29% 0.32% $182,800 -0.05 $950.26 $40,725.36
Phoenix 4.29% 0.32% $237,900 +0.98 $1,115.47 $47,805.95
Tampa 4.29% 0.32% $207,500 +1.22 $1,119.51 $47,979.10
San Antonio 4.29% 0.32% $202,600 -1.79 $1,186.47 $50,848.70
Philadelphia 4.29% 0.32% $209,000 -5.69 $1,221.61 $52,354.73
Orlando 4.29% 0.32% $230,000 +1.01 $1,229.98 $52,713.58
Minneapolis 4.29% 0.32% $234,700 -0.21 $1,254.90 $53,781.51
Baltimore 4.29% 0.32% $237,600 -3.38 $1,281.37 $54,915.83
Houston 4.29% 0.32% $222,300 -0.98 $1,296.12 $55,547.95
Dallas 4.29% 0.32% $236,500 +2.56 $1,362.60 $58,397.27
Chicago 4.29% 0.32% $228,600 +0.93 $1,386.20 $59,408.47
Sacramento 4.29% 0.32% $319,700 +0.22 $1,589.85 $68,136.37
Miami 4.29% 0.32% $318,000 +2.42 $1,637.63 $70,183.99
Portland 4.29% 0.32% $359,900 +1.47 $1,727.56 $74,038.31
Denver 4.29% 0.32% $396,100 +3.80 $1,812.12 $77,662.37
Washington 4.29% 0.32% $383,500 -0.21 $1,926.05 $82,544.92
Seattle 4.29% 0.32% $422,100 -0.28 $2,017.52 $86,465.00
Boston 4.29% 0.32% $414,200 -0.77 $2,133.11 $91,419.05
New York 4.29% 0.32% $386,000 +0.97 $2,233.68 $95,729.31
Los Angeles 4.29% 0.32% $485,800 -4.11 $2,299.32 $98,542.31
San Diego 4.36% 0.26% $564,000 -0.70 $2,605.53 $111,665.80
San Francisco 4.36% 0.26% $815,000 -1.81 $3,759.24 $161,110.33

Comments

  1. Kirsten September 12, 2016 8:34 pm

    I wish you could make $160k a year and afford a house in the Bay Area. Ha!!!

      Reply»  
    1. Editorial Team September 13, 2016 12:27 pm

      Kirsten, This salary number is based of the median-price home (half the homes sold for more, half sold for less) as provided by the National Association of Realtors for the entire metro area, defined here: http://www.hsh.com/finance/real-estate/metro-area-definitions.html Thanks for commenting,Tim Manni, HSH.com.

        Reply »  
  2. AJ Johnston September 12, 2016 6:31 pm

    We live in Indy. It's $72 per sqaure foot in the city and around $89 per square foot in the suburbs... so my 2600ft colonial with 4 beds, 2 1/2 baths on a quarter acre overlooking a pond costs me $973 every month. Taxes are capped at 1% and my HOA is $200 a year.

      Reply»  
  3. Laura September 12, 2016 4:20 pm

    Why isn't Kansas City, Missouri on here?

      Reply»  
    1. Editorial Team September 13, 2016 12:30 pm

      Laura, Because we are utilizing the 27-largest metro areas (as defined by the OMB). Thanks for commenting, Tim Manni, HSH.com

        Reply »  
  4. tada September 12, 2016 1:53 pm

    Guys, in Atlanta atleast, the pricing is very underestimated. in any reasonable neighborhood, prices are north of 400k atleast.

      Reply»  
    1. Editorial Team September 13, 2016 12:31 pm

      Tada, You're probably right. But we're using the data that is available to us and to everyone else: median home prices (half sold for more, half sold for less) in the metro area. The Atlanta metro area is defined here: http://www.hsh.com/finance/real-estate/metro-area-definitions.html. Thanks for commenting, Tim Manni, HSH.com

        Reply »  
  5. Mariano Cortes September 12, 2016 1:03 pm

    How disappointing, i want to buy a home in NY, Long Island, i think i need a huge raise to do so.

      Reply»  
  6. Erika September 10, 2016 3:58 pm

    $480,000 in Los Angeles?! Try doubling that! Where are these numbers coming from??

      Reply»  
    1. Editorial Team September 13, 2016 12:44 pm

      Erika, These home price numbers are coming from the National Association of Realtors. It is the median home price (half the homes sold for more, half sold for less) for the entire LA metro area. See metro definitions here: http://www.hsh.com/finance/real-estate/metro-area-definitions.html Thanks for commenting. Tim Manni, HSH.com

        Reply »  
  7. James Fountain September 04, 2016 4:37 pm

    You should check out home pricing in and around Austin Tx. It's very expensive there. The closer to the city the more it costs. Very expensive.

      Reply»  
  8. Rob September 02, 2016 11:43 pm

    Looks like SF is not treated as the "major metropolitan area" of the Bay Area. So this compares SF without Oakland or Alemeda to NYC with Bronx and Staten Island. I'm sure there are similar issues in other cities.

      Reply»  
    1. Melina M September 13, 2016 10:21 am

      Actually, it looks like "San Francisco" includes all of the city, Alameda county, Marin county, San Mateo county, and Contra Costa county. If it were San Francisco by itself, the median price goes up by over a quarter million dollars to about $1.15 million, which is actually down from the $1.3 million at the beginning of the year. Citation: http://www.hsh.com/finance/real-estate/metro-area-definitions.html and http://sf.curbed.com/2015/12/8/9893366/san-franciscos-median-house-price-holds-strong-at-1-3m

        Reply »  
  9. Mike September 01, 2016 8:01 pm

    What is Burlington, VT?

      Reply»  
  10. Lisa September 01, 2016 11:57 am

    Hi, I have been looking at apartments in NYC and Los Angeles and was surprised that LA was more expensive than NYC. From what I have seen NYC is so much more expensive. Just wondering if you would have any additional factors/insights that would go into the stats.

      Reply»  
    1. Editorial Team September 06, 2016 1:37 pm

      Hey Lisa, thanks for commenting. "Just wondering if you would have any additional factors/insights that would go into the stats." If you look on the first and last slide you will see all the factors that went into these calculations. Thanks for commenting. -Tim Manni, HSH.com

        Reply »  

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